War of the Rebellion: Serial 046 Page 0605 Chapter XL. BOMBARDMENT OF FORT SUMTER, S. C.

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to make to occupy and hold the place. Should anything occur to convince me that there would be any advantage in holding the place, I shall not hesite to make the attempt. I had an interview with Real-Admiral Dahlgren yesterday. He has recently received dispatches from the Navy Department, embracing its "views" on affairs here, but I have not yet seen the dispatches. I am acting without "instructions," and have been ever since I assumed command of this department, I do not shrink from respectfully, but I am convinced that the best interests of the service require that I should be intrusted with the views of the War Department in reference to matters here. Otherwise I might take some step involving the Government in embarrassment.

I inclose a correct sketch of Fort Sumter, taken on the 10th instant.*

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

In the Field, Folly Island, S. C., November 20, 1863.

SIR: Nothing of special has transpired here since my letter of the 12th instant.

I keep up a slow shall fire on the ruins of Sumter, to prevent any work being done inside. I ordered a reconnaissance of the place last night, of the nature of a simulated attack, with a view to compel the garrison to show its strength.

The inclosed dispatch, + just received from Brigadier-General Terry, commanding on Morris Island, gives all I yet know of the result.

The Charleston papers inform us that travers and bomb-proofs were constructed in the work during the interval between the first and second bombardments.

This was while we were besieging Fort Wagner and establishing guns on Cummings' Point. I inclose a slip from the Charleston Curier, of the 11th instant, containing this statement.+

The new monitors are expect here about the middle of December. I have always entertained serious doubles that we would become relative stronger by waiting for these new vessels. For every gun they will bring into action, the enemy will have had time to established a dozen.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant.

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Fully Island, S. C., November 26, 1863.

SIR: I have nothing of special importance to report./ I fire but slowly at Sumter, and that simply to prevent work being done inside

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* See p. 603.

+ See inclosures to report of November 26, p. 606.

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