War of the Rebellion: Serial 046 Page 0604 Chapter XI. S. C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. AND E. FLA.

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of Fort Sumter, I opened fire upon that work yesterday, with the guns from Wagner and Gregg. The firing is progressing to-day with satisfactory effect.

I inclose a Charleston newspaper of the 24th instant.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

In the Field, Fully Island, S. C., October 30, 1863-1 p. m.

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that the operation of our breaching guns in Wagner and Gregg (Fort Strong and Fort Putnam), against the southeast face of Fort Sumter, has been as successful as I could desire. That face is now more completely a ruin than the george wall. Most of its arches have already tumbled in. The others are rapidly crumbling away, and the ruined terre-plains of the channel fronts are plainly visible. No guns have been disclosed upon either of these faces, and the reports that some pieces had been remounted there are doubtless incorrect. Sumter replies with harmless musketry fire only. I shall continue the firing for at least twenty-four hours longer, and probably shall then make an assault, although I have not yet fully determined upon it.

Some of the monitors have taken part in the bombardment and have done good execution.

The enemy's batteries on James and Sullivan's Island reply but slowly, and have done us no harm as yet.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Major-General, Commanding.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

In the Field, Folly Island, S. C., November 12, 1863.

GENERAL: I have to report no essential charge in the condition of things here since my letter of October 30. I keep up a slow fire on the ruins of Fort Sumter night and day. During the daytime, I fire mostly from mortars at low angels, in order to search the casemates on the channel front. During the night, a few light guns play upon the breaches to prevent any defensive measures being taken by the enemy. Some of the monitors occasionally engage int eh bombardment. The enemy do not reply, except sometimes with small arms. Of the practicability of carrying the place by assault, I entertain but little doubt, but I have never seen any necessity for doing so, while its sole power of doing harm consists in the protection which its infantry garrison affords to the channel obstruction. I am convinced that those obstructions can be removed while Sumter is occupied by the enemy with less sacrifice of life than we would have