War of the Rebellion: Serial 046 Page 0503 Chapter XL. OPERATIONS ON MORRIS ISLAND, S.C.

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BATTERY WAGNER, August 21, 1863.

I have the honor to make the following report as to the present condition of Battery Wagner:

The parapets this work are in as good condition to-day as at any time since I have been on duty at the post. I consider all the magazines and bomb-proofs secure from direct or vertical fire, the guns all in working condition, with the exception of 10-inch columbiad in northernmost chamber. It requires a working party of 200 men, every night, and 1,000 sand-bags to keep the fort up to its present standard.

I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. W. GREGORIE,

Captain of Engineers, in Charge Defenses Morris Island.

Captain P. K. MOLONY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

BATTERY WAGNER, August 22, 1863.

CAPTAIN: The engineer works were pushed forward last night with 100 men.

I repaired sea face, which was sadly torn up by the Ironsides, also traverse over southeast magazine, which was nearly cut through; repaired embrasure on salient, and erected merlons for the protection of the men at the guns. Commenced on traverse before the door of southwest magazine.

I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. W. GREGORIE,

Captain of Engineers.

Captain MOLONY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Indorsement.]

AUGUST 22, 1863-7.40 a.m.

Captain NANCE:

It took the whole night to do the above work, no firing could therefore be had from our land face. Pickets fighting all night.

This morning the enemy's sappers have reached McMillans' house (burned).

JOHNSON HAGOOD,

Brigadier-General.

No. 29. Report of Captain J. T. Champneys, C. S. Corps of Engineers.

CHARLESTON, S. C., September 1, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to make the following report in connection with my official position at Battery Wagner during the time I was there on duty-from the night of Sunday, August 23, to that of Sunday, the 30th. Owing to the loss of my journal and of the notes taken upon the ground, by the sinking of the steamer Sumter, I am