War of the Rebellion: Serial 046 Page 0502 S.C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. AND E. FLA. Chapter XL.

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James Island must be instructed to observe closely and obey strictly any information so communicated.

A detachment must be sent to work the 10-inch mortar, and every effort made to keep it provided with a sufficient supply of shell, which is represented as being now deficient.

About 200 rounds of 12-pounder howitzer shell, filled, but without fuses, are much needed at Wagner, and must be furnished as soon as practicable.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOMAS JORDAN,

Chief of Staff.

HDQRS. FIRST MIL. DIST. DEPT. S. C., GA., AND FLA.,

Charleston, August 29, 1863.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of yours of this date, touching the defense of Battery Wagner, and to reply that every practicable effort has been and will continue to be made to preserve our possession of that fort. A constant fire has been ordered to be kept up from the James Island batteries, and communication kept up between Battery Wagner and those batteries, to regulate the fire. Upon the application of the commanding officer, two days ago a picked company of artillerists was sent down to furnish details for the mortar. The howitzers shell have been required for, but there are none at the arsenal; every effort is being made to get them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. S. RIPLEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Brigadier General THOMAS JORDAN,

Chief of Staff and Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Memorandum.]

General JORDAN:

Call Colonel Waddy's attention to the want of these howitzer shells. Let him get them forthwith, if possible.

G. T. B. [BEAUREGARD],

General, Commanding.

No. 28. Reports of Captain J. W. Gregorie, C. S. Corps of Engineers.

BATTERY WAGNER, August 21, 1863.

CAPTAIN: The enemy are advancing against this work by a heavy sap, and have progressed 100 yards in the last twenty-four hours. They work steadily all day, having such a large sap-roller that it is impossible for our sharpshooters to see the sappers. The distance from their advance sap to the fort is not over 450 yards. They will reach the sand-hill occupied by our picket in four or five days.

I have the honor to be, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. W. GREGORIE,

Captain of Engineers, in Charge Defenses Morris Island.

Captain P. K. MOLONY,

Assistant Adjutant-General.