War of the Rebellion: Serial 046 Page 0482 S.C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. AND E.FLA. Chapter XL.

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Twenty-fifth South Carolina Volunteers) was killed and 1 wounded, on the flank curtain.

8.30 a.m. The bombardment of the Ironsides terminated at 7.45; combined with the land fire was rapid and fatal in its effects, falling heavily upon the Twenty-fifth South Carolina Volunteers. The principal damage was done by a shell exploding in the entrance to the parade between the sally-port and the passage opposite, throwing fragments into the crowd in the passage (between Magazine C and bomb-proof), wounding a large number and creating a general stampede for the bomb-proof, which I was obliged to check. Inclosed are rough lists of casualties up to this hour.* The Ironsides knocked down a large lot of sand from the traverse above the headquarters passage, and the continual fire of rifled guns is shaking down more. The exit to the rear is nearly blocked up, but I have a detail working to replace. There has been a heavy rifled gun fire upon the south end of bomb-proof, knocking away half the traverse in front of the stairs leading to the left salient from the bomb-proof and Magazine B.

I have assigned Captain Lesesne to the command of Battery Gregg. Captain Huguenin ranks him and remains chief of artillery.

The 9-inch Dahlgren was not mounted last night, in spite of my efforts. The enemy appear determined to keep a heavy fire against this battery. I will send the slightly wounded to the sand-hills. This bombardment is probably a preliminary to an assault or an attempt to penetrate bomb-proof and magazine by continual displacement of sand.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

LAWRENCE M. KEITT,

Colonel, Commanding.

Captain W. F. NANCE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[P. S.]-Send candles.

MORRIS ISLAND, VIA FORT JOHNSON, September 5, 1863.

(Received September 6-12.45 a.m.)

I had about 900, and not 1,400 men. About 100 of these to-day were killed and wounded. The parapet of salient is badly breached. The whole fort is much weakened. A repetition to-morrow of to-day's fire will make the fort almost a ruin. The mortar fire is still very heavy and fatal, and no important work can be done.

It is desirable to sacrifice the garrison? To continue to hold it is to do so. Captain [T. B.] Lee, the engineer, has read this and agrees. Act promptly and answer at once.

LAWRENCE M. KEITT,

Colonel, Commanding.

Captain NANCE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

MORRIS ISLAND,

September 6, 1863-3.15 p.m.

Will boats be here to-night for garrison? If so, at what time? And if our sacrifice be of benefit, I am ready. Let it be said so, and I will storm the enemy's works at once, or lose every man here.

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*Not found.

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