War of the Rebellion: Serial 046 Page 0440 S.C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. AND E. FLA. Chapter XL.

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short intervals for one hour and a half. We did not return the fire from the Ironsides and monitors, as it was not deemed advisable to engage them at such, long range. The fire from the fleet, enfilading the land face and proving destructive, compelled us to cease firing. As soon as the vessels withdrew, the sharpshooters resumed their work.

Last night, as briefly mentioned in yesterday's journal, an attempt was made to seize by assault our rifle-pits, and the enemy succeeded in establishing themselves within 20 yards of them before we could re-enforce our men. The re-enforcements, however, under Lieutenant Colonel O. M. Dantzler, Twentieth Regiment South Carolina Volunteers, drove their line back, and held nearly our original vedette stations during the night. It is but simple justice to mention the decision and promptitude with which Colonel Dantzler accomplished his purpose, as well as to acknowledge the unfailing zeal and gallantry with which he has served at this post during his whole tour of duty here. The colonel was shot through the breast of his coat while pushing forward his vedettes.

The enemy's sap was advanced during last night to McMillan's burned house, and I regret to say that our fire to-day appears to have produced no other effect than to prevent much visible progress being made either forward or in completion of last night's work. It was in an imperfect state, and made of gabions and sand-bags, and I had hoped by our fire to have knocked so much of it to pieces. A flag of truce was sent out at dawn to deliver a communication from General Beauregard to General Gillmore.

The damage to the fort will require all night to repair, and, consequently, I do not propose to inaugurate night fire from the fort, but I have strengthened the force in the rifle-pits, and propose to retard the enemy's work with infantry, fire from these, as far as practicable.

Casualties, 25, of which 4 killed.

Effective strength:

Infantry................................................... 816

Artillery.................................................. 251

Sharpshooters.............................................. 15

Cavalry.................................................... 11

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Aggregate................................................ 1,098

Commissary reports about seven days' rations. They are being issued to the troops.

From the manner in which the enemy's sap is being pushed, there is imminent danger of their flanking to-night or to-morrow our chain of rifle-pits, and forcing their abandonment.

My engineer has not been able to suggest a counter move. This appears to me to be a matter of great importance. Cannot the chief engineer come over to-night?

The report from Battery Gregg is herewith sent.*

Very respectfully submitted.

JOHNSON HAGOOD.

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Captain W. F. NANCE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

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*See Gilchrist's report of August 22, Numbers 48, p. 548, post.

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