War of the Rebellion: Serial 046 Page 0238 S.C. AND GA. COASTS,AND IN MID. AND E. FLA. Chapter XL.

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the purpose of firing in one constant direction, no provision was necessary in the carriages for a horizontal field.

139. The peculiar arrangement of the right batteries represented in Plate VII was to admit of a gun mounted on a siege carriage being fired at a very high elevation. the trail of the gun carriage drops into the pit and rests on the lower platform. The wheels are supported by the upper platform, the platform being parallel to one another. The recoil takes place without changing the vertical angle of the axis of the piece.

140. The platforms are laid at an angle of 5 degrees from the horizontal rising to the rear. These batteries work very well; but I am of opinion that it would be better to have less inclination of the platforms.

141. Plate XII represents a pier, constructed during the latter part of July by Captain Walker, Volunteer Engineers, at pawnee Landing, Folly Island. Fig. 1 is a general elevation; Fig. 2, a plan. It was for the purpose of facilitating transportation from Folly River to Morris Island.

142. A fortification, for a garrison of 200 men, is now in courts of erection upon the left of Black Island. I shall have the honor to describe this work in some other report.

143. A permanent pier, 155 feet long, 31 feet wide, and having a T 69 feet long, has been constructed and is now nearly ready for use at the south end of Morris Island, near the ordnance yard. This pier extends out in ot the channel of Light-House Inlet to 9 feet of water at low tide; it is very strong and substantial. The piles were all driven by a hand engine; the timbers were obtained upon Folly Island, and brought to and across the river with great labor. The work was under the direction of Major Richard Butt, Volunteer Engineers.

144. During the siege, there had been made, under the direction of Lieutenants Mehles and Harrold, Volunteer Engineers, 1,429 gabions, 464 fescines, 11 sap-rollers, and 4 anchors baskets.

145. During the bombardment, Lieutenant W. H. Baldwin, Volunteer Engineers, had charge of the naval batteries, was dangerously wounded.

147. Where all have done so well, it is impossible to make distinctions.

148. To the officers and men of all arms I am greatly indebted for hearty co-operation and assistance. The fatigue duty has been excessive, but it has, under the most trying is impossible to make distinctions.

148. To the officers and men of all arms I am greatly indebted for hearty co-operation and assistance. The fatigue duty has been excessive, but it has, under the most trying circumstances, in all cases been most cheerfully performed.

149. Individual acts of heroism and personal bravery have been of daily occurrence. Nothing has seemed too hazardous to under take or too difficult to execute.

150. The establishment of the engineer depot on Morris Island by Captain Frederick H. Cruso, and the manner in which he conducted the manufacture of large quantities of engineer material, while under my direction, during the early part of the siege, was satisfactory. Captain Cruso was assisted by Lieutenant Richard Coe.

151. The following-named officers have acted as my assistants, and it is with great pleasure that I present them to your favorable consideration: Major Richard Butt, Captain Frederick E. Graef, Captain Samuel C. Eaton, Captain Joseph Walker, Captain John L. Suess, Captain