War of the Rebellion: Serial 046 Page 0206 S.C. AND GA. COASTS,AND IN MID. AND E. FLA. Chapter XL.

Search Civil War Official Records

front of that work that could be brought to bear on an assaulting column, and it is not improbable that an assault will be made tomorrow morning by way of the beach on the seaside.

I think, also, that by the use of several howitzer boats, borrowed, from the fleet, I have succeeded in thoroughly investing this island.

Several of my heavy guns are at work trying to breach the bomb-proof shelter of Fort Wagner, with a fair prospect of success.

Whether the work will be assaulted, or its garrison starve doubt, or driven out by the fire of the bomb-proof, will in all probability be determined within the next twenty-four hours.

Some prisoners, taken on the water by one of the picket-boats night before last, among whom is Major Warley, Second South Carolina artillery, and chief of artillery on General Ripley's staff, confirm the former reports that there are no serviceable guns in Fort Sumter.

After we obtain possession of Cumming's Point, I desire to visit Washington for conference and instructions.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Fort Wagner, Morris Island, S. C., September 7, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to report that last night our sappers crowned the crest of the counterscarp of Fort Wagner on its sea front, masking all its guns, and an order was issued to carry the place by assault at 9 o'clock this morning, that being the hour of low tide. About 10 o'clock last night the enemy commenced evacuating the island, and all but 75 of them made their escape from Cumming's Point in small boats. Captured dispatches show that Fort Wagner was commanded by Colonel Keitt, of South Carolina, and garrisoned by 1,400 effective men, and Battery Gregg by between 100 and 200.

Fort Wagner is a work of the most formidable kind. Its bombproof sheller, capable of containing 1,800 men, remains intact, after the most terrific bombardment to which any work was ever subjected.

We have captured nineteen pieces of artillery and a large supply of excellent ammunition.

The city and harbor of Charleston are now completely covered by my guns.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

In the Field, Morris Island, S. C., September 8, 1863.

SIR: I have the honor to report that for the defense of this island, and to enable us to take advantage of the position we now hold, I have made the following arrangements:

First. At Cumming's Point I shall construct a small inclosed