War of the Rebellion: Serial 046 Page 0205 Chapter XL. OPERATIONS ON MORRIS ISLAND, S. C.

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The monitors are expected to commence operations against the obstructions very soon.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Morris Island, S. C., August 29, 1863.

SIR: The most important circumstance that has transpired within the last went-four hours is the arrival of heavy re-enforcements to the enemy. It is estimated that during that time 4,000 men came down Cooper River in steamers, probably from the railroad wharf, and landed at Sullivan's Island and at Mount Pleasant. This occurred in the daytime. What may have been accomplished during the night is not known.

The monitors have not yet commenced operations upon the obstructions.

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Morris Island, S. C., September 4, 1863.

GENERAL: I have no important change in the condition of affairs here to report We are gradually creeping up the Fort Wagner. If my plans succeed, I shall have possession of all of this island in four or five days. The two days' firing at Sumter (31st ultimo and 1st instant) resulted in knocking down five guns that may have been partially serviceable before that. All the rampart of Sumger is plainly visible from our lookout, and not a gun remains in position there at the present moment. On the night of the 1st, the monitors went in and opened on Sumter at 500 yards. They remained in action four or five hours, hauling off at daybreak. The fort did not respond at all. There are, therefore, no casemate guns on either the east or southeasts faces our shots have passed through and through. I deem it safe to say that Sumter is perfectly silenced, and has been so practically since the 23rd ultimo. I think some guns were remounted between the 23rd and 31st ultimo.

Q. A. GILLMORE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE SOUTH,

Morris Island, S. C., September 6, 1863.

SIR: I have to report that my approaches to Fort Wagner have now been pushed forward so as to mask all the guns on the south