War of the Rebellion: Serial 046 Page 0163 Chapter XI. GENERAL REPORTS.

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he left Palmetto Point on the 11th instant, and from Bear Island examined Little and Big Islands (known on the map as Barnwell's Island). The former appeared to be occupied by negroes and a few pickets; the front of the latter is not occupied, but the rear is picketed. He proceeded up Whale Branch as far as Dr. F. Capers', where ha landed, and, scouting the place, passed near enough to Flers' to hear negroes laughing and talking. Scouting the rear of Barnwell's brick and white houses, at the former place, he found a strong picket force. From the sound of drums, &c., he thinks most of the enemy's forces are occupying the upper portion of the island- that is, in front of Port Royal Ferry-and only a picket guard along the coast of Broad River. He spent two nights and one day in the lines.

A negro driver, recently returned from the enemy's lines, reports a regiment at Barnwell's white house; also one at Baynard's, east side Broad River, several miles below Barnwell's. This man confirms the report of our lookout at Foot Point-that some troops (supposed to be a regiment of drafted men) had arrived from Hilton Head.

The following dispatches of the enemy were intercepted:

Colonel S----:

Captain

-----

Cruse selected the best boat crews. There are no good ones here.

C----,

Lieutenant.

General G----:

I have two 11-inch guns in a vessel drawing 7 feet of water. I can lend them to you.

D

------

,

Admiral.

Admiral D

-----

:

Thank you. I will take them, and will order the quartermaster to have the vessel towed into Light-House Inlet.

G

-----

,

General.

On the 12th instant, General Ripley addressed a letter to the chief of staff relating to Captain [G.] Le Gardeur [jr.'s] battery, the proper defense of Sullivan's Island, and to the scarcity of beef furnished to his command. This scarcity makes serious inroads upon his supply of bacon. So much of the above as relates to the subsistence department was referred to Major [H. C.] Guerin, who returns it to-day with his remarks, to wit:

On the 10th instant, 250 beeves (for the use of Sullivan's Island and Mount Pleasant) were waiting near Monk's Corner for drivers to bring them down.

Captain [W. H.] Wigg had men for this service, but their horses were disabled, and it has been found impracticable to furnish others for them. A cavalry detail, he believes, has been made for the purpose, and his department will make strenuous efforts to get and drive down cattle while there are any to be had. Bacon cannot be supplied for three months, probably, but the troops will get some pickled pork and beef. A great scarcity of meat is inevitable, and interruptions of the supply will, he fears, be sometimes unavoidable.

November 15, 1863.-The usual bombardment was sustained last night by Sumter. The number of shots, however, that were fired by the enemy is not reported, as is also the case with to-day's bombard-