War of the Rebellion: Serial 046 Page 0034 S. C. AND GA. COATS, AND IN MID. AND E. FLA. Chapter XL.

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To the best of my knowledge, the only cases in which shell were fired containing the solidified Greek, fire are enumerated below:

Number Projectile Manner in which filled

s of shell

shots.

10 200-pounder 20 pieces in each and 3 pounds powder

5 ....do.... 30 pieces in each and 3 pounds powder

1 100-pounder 24 pieces in each and 2 pounds powder

1 ....do.... .............do............

1 30-pounder 12 pieces in each and 1 1/2 pounds

powder

7 200-pounder Full, and powder shaken in........

1 10-inch mortar Filled by Mr. Short

1 ....do.... ............do.............

1 30-pounder ............do.............

1 ....do.... Filled by Mr. Short and covered with

several thickness of paper

1 ....do.... ............do.............

1 ....do.... ............do.............

1 ....do.... Filled by Mr. Short and covered with

layers of muslin

1 ....do.... ............do.............

1 ....do.... ............do.............

1 ....do.... ............do.............

1 ....do.... ............do.............

4 ....do.... ............do.............

1 ....do.... ............do.............

Number Charge Fuse Elevation Remarks

s of

shots.

10 18 Per. 32^ Well.

5 18 Per. 32^ Burst in gun.

1 10 Per. 35^ Do.

1 10 Per. 35^

1 3 1/4 Per. 30^ Well.

7 16 Per. 12'' All burst in gun,

or shortly after

leaving it.

1 1 10'' 45^ Struck before the

fuse burned out.

1 1 10'' 45 Well.

1 3 5'' 3 1/2^ Did not burst.

1 3 5'' 5^ Burst 150 yards

from gun.

1 3 5'' 5^ Burst 5''.

1 3 5'' 5^ Do.

1 3 12'' 12^ Burst 12''.

1 3 12'' 12^ Did not burst.

1 3 12'' 12^ Burst 12''.

1 3 5'' 5^ Burst 5''.

1 3 5'' 5^ Burst 5''; tumbled.

4 3 Per. 12^ Burst in gun.

1 3 Per. 12^ Do.

This solidified Greek fire in intensity of heat is surpassed by the common port fire used in artillery.

Fortifications.

161. The rapid breaching of Fort Pulaski, in April, 1862, at the distance of 1,650 yards, and the more recent demolition of Fort Sumter with batteries, the nearest, and, moreover, no the heaviest, of which was 3,475 yards distant from that work, have very naturally led to inquiries into the merits of masonry forts with exposed scarps, and with their armament arranged tier above tier, which forms a most prominent feature in the system of works adopted and now being constructed for the defense of our important harbors, arsenals, and depots. If it believed that the modifications in the character of such works called for by the newly developed powers of modern artillery are mostly those of detail and not of principle. It is not impossible, but, in fact, probable, that some of our works, most judiciously located, doubtless, to meet all the essential requirements of defense at the time their construction was commenced, and before the invention of rifled ordnance, may not be on the sites where the present conditions of the modified problem would place them, and consequently the construction of additional works or outworks may have become necessary at points which formerly we might with impunity have allowed an enemy to occupy.

It may, and probably will, be necessary to construct earthworks or use iron plating to cover the masonry of some of our permanent fortifications that might without much hazard have been left exposed to the smooth-bore guns of the former calibers.

162. Military critics should keep in view the principle which has controlled the location and general character of our works for harbor defense, the office which those works are designed to fill, and the