War of the Rebellion: Serial 046 Page 0022 S. C. AND GA. COASTS, AND IN MID. AND E. FLA. Chapter XL.

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Third. Battery Meade, First Lieutenant Henry Holbrook, Third Rhode Island Volunteer Artillery, comprising two 100-pounder Parrott rifles, against the gorge wall of Fort Sumter, both pieces firing percussion shell exclusively.

Fourth. Battery Kearny, First. S. S. Atwell, Seventh Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, commanding, comprising three 30-pounder Parrott rifles and three Coehorn mortars. The guns operate against Battery Gregg with shot and shell, unless otherwise directed, and the mortars against Fort Wagner, exploding the shell just over the fort.

Fifth. The Naval Battery, Commander F. A. Parker, U. S. Navy, commanding, comprising two 8-inch Parrott rifles and two 80-pounder Whitwort rifles, against the gorge wall and barbette fire of Fort Sumter, at the discretion of the battery commander.

Sixth. Battery Reynold, Captain A. E. Greene, Third Rhode Island Volunteer Artillery, commanding, comprising five 10-inch siege mortars, against Fort Wagner, exploding the shells just before striking.

Seventh. Battery Weed, Captain B. F. Skinner, Seventh Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, commanding, comprising five 10-inch siege mortars, to fire the same as Battery Reynolds.

Eight. Battery Hays, Captain R. G. Shaw, Third Rhode Island Volunteer Artillery, commanding, comprising one 8-inch Parrott rifle, against the gorge wall of Fort Sumter, with shot exclusively; and seven 30-pounder Parrott rifles against Fort Wagner or Battery Gregg, as may from time to time be ordered.

Ninth. Battery Reno, Captain A. W. Colwell, Third Rhode Island Volunteer Artillery, commanding, comprising one 8-inch and two 10-pounder Parrott rifles, against the gorge wall of Fort Sumter; one 100-pounder to fire shot, and the other pieces to fire percussion shell, exclusively.

Tenth. Battery Stevens, Lieutenant J. E. Wilson, Fifth U. S. Artillery, commanding, comprising two 100-pounder Parrott rifles, against the gorge wall of Fort Sumter, one piece firing shot, and the other percussion shell, exclusively.

Eleventh. Battery Strong, Captain S. H. Gray, Seventh Connecticut Volunteer Infantry, commanding, containing one 10-inch Parrott rifle, against the gorge wall of Fort Sumter, firing shot and percussion shell, commencing with the former.

Twelfth. Battery Kirby, Lieutenant Charles Sellemer, Eleventh Maine Volunteer Infantry, commanding,comprising two 10-inch seacoast mortars, against Fort Sumter, the shells to be exploded within the fort just before striking.

II. The brigadier-general commanding takes this occasion to remind the officers and men under his command, and especially those ot whom he had this day assigned the posts of honor and of danger, that the eyes of a beneficent country are fixed upon them, with not only the ardent hope, but the confident expectation, of success. The nation is indeed waiting to crown you the victors of Sumter. We need not, and must not, fail. Let us fearlessly do our whole duty to our beloved country, and in the language of our late companion in arms, the gallant and lamented Strong, "Put our trust in God."

By order of Brigadier General Q. A. Gillmore:

ED. W. SMITH,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

131. Exact distance of breaching guns from the center of gorge wall of Fort Sumter: Battery Brown, two 8-inch Parrott rifles, 3, 516 yards; Battery Rosecrans, three 100-pounder Parrott rifles, 3,447 yards; Battery Meade, two 100-pounder Parrott rifles, 3,428 yards; Naval Battery, two 80-pounder Whitworth rifles and two 8-inch Parrott rifles, 3,938 yards; Battery Hays, one 8-inch Parrott rifle, 4,172 yards; Battery Reno, one 8-inch and two 100-pounder Parrott rifles, 4,272 yards; Battery Stevens, two 100-pounder Parrott rifles, 4,278 yards; Battery Strong, one 10-pounder Parrott rifle, 4,290 yards.

132. The breaching guns were served from day to day with great care and deliberation. The firing from the batteries in the second parallel was seriously interfered with, and, at times, partially suspended, by the galling fire from Fort Wagner to which the cannoneers were exposed. The combined fire of our mortars and light pieces, aided by gunboats and iron-clads, failed to subdue this annoyance entirely, and we were obliged to turn some of our breach.

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*Paragraph II was omitted from Gillmore's report.

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