War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 1084 Chapter XXXIX. N. C., VA., W. VA., MA., PA., ETC.

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persons. Lee is in the State. We are expecting an attack at this point hourly. We no' certainly require the aid of the people of New

Jersey. Do not relax your efforts to arouse your people. Let me hear from you.

A. G. CURTIN,

Governor of. Pennsylvania.

JUNE 30, 1863-12. 15 a. m.

Commanding Officer Second Corps:

Your dispatch of 9, 30 p. m. yesterday received. I am instructed to say that the country people must have mistaken our own cavalry for that of the enemy, as the commanding general has been officially informed by General Pleasonton that he has two brigades under General Gregg at Westminster.

Very respectfully,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

JUNE, 30, 1863.

Major-General COUCH:

I am in position between Emmitsburg and Westminster, advancing upon the enemy. The enemy hold (A. P. Hill) Cashtown Pass, between Gettysburg and Chambersburg. Their cavalry-three to five brigades-are on my right, between me and the Northern Central. My force is tolerably well concentrated, moving with all the speed that the trains, roads, and physique of the men will bear. I am without definite and positive information as to the whereabouts of Longstreet and Ewell. The latter I presume to be in front of you. The army is in good spirits, and we shall push to your relief or the engagement of the enemy, as circumstances and the information we receive during the day and in the marches may indicate as most prudent and most likely to lead to ultimate success. I am anxious to hear from you, and get information of the disposition of the enemy and his movements so far as you know them. If you are in telegraph communication, or otherwise, with Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington, I should like supplies and shoes accumulated, to be thrown to me on the line of Northern Central or the Susquehanna as circumstances may require or my movements may make most advisable. Please communicate my dispatch to the General-in-Chief. My communications with him are intercepted by the cavalry of the enemy on my right. Can you keep the enemy from crossing the river?

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

JULY 1, 1863.

Commanding Officer Cavalry Corps:

The arrival here of the telegraph operators and repair men from Frederick announces the fact of the non-arrival of the dispatches which were intrusted to you to be forwarded, and also that no order-