War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 1074 Chapter XXXIX. N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC.

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FRANKLIN, August 2, 1863.

General ARNOLD ELZEY:

Enemy's infantry, 2, 500 strong, under General Foster, took their boats for New Berne, N. C., Thursday night, at Winton, on the Chowan. Cavalry, under Spear, crossed soon after, and moved in the direction of Suffolk. Yesterday morning, at 9 o'clock, their cavalry passed within half a mile of South Quay, 6 miles from Franklin, Va. They had no stragglers in this expedition we could pick up. In our skirmishes with them we lost 6 men; 2 of theirs were killed, and others wounded.

JOEL R. GRIFFIN,

Colonel, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS,

Petersburg, Va., August 3, 1863.

Major General ARNOLD ELZEY:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that, as reported by officers on the lines, the enemy has retired from this front. Colonel Griffin reports the infantry retired to New Berne, the cavalry, &c., by way of Suffolk. I therefore think it safe, whenever you think it best to bring back the previous arrangement of troops.

Very truly and respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. JENKINS,

Brigadier-General.

AUGUST 3, 1863.

General BEAUREGARD, Charleston:

I have just received the following from General Martin Kinston:

Have information from New Berne of yesterday morning. Foster left for Fort Monroe of Friday. Negro regiments for Charleston. Infantry at New Berne, about 4, 000; cavalry increased to 2, 000, at least. Raids to be constant. Palmer in command at New Berne.

W. H. C. WHITING,

Major-General.

ENGINEER BUREAU,

Richmond, August 3, 1863.

Commanding Officer near Fredericksburg:

SIR: Under instructions from the War Department, I have assigned Lieutenant Stuart, Corps of Engineers, to the duty of removing the railroad iron from the road north of Fredericksburg. I have respectfully to request that to will extend all the assistance and protection you can to the work. Railroad iron is a vital necessity to the country, and we should save every bar that can be reached. I hope you will send a force from your command to destroy the road and all the material beyond Potomac Run. This may be the means of much delaying any advance that may be attempted by the enemy from the Aquia Creek Landing.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. F. GILMER,

Colonel for Engineers, and Chief of Bureau.