War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 1018 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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UNION, July 17, 1863.

Major-General JONES:

Your telegram of yesterday evening only came through this morning. It is reported to me that the piece of artillery sent to Gauley has returned, being able only to reach within 12 miles of that point, the enemy having blockaded the road. I have no report from Colonel Corns. I received last night from Colonel Jackson dispatches stating the probability of some movement of the enemy at Beverly toward him. He did not credit it altogether, but thought it probable. I will send the particulars by the courier this evening.

JNO. ECHOLS,

Brigadier-General.

UNION, July 17, 1863.

Major General SAMUEL JONES:

Colonel Corns' report just received. Will send it to you to-night. He drove in the pickets of the enemy near Gauley on the 15th instant, causing much excitement with them. The Kanawha turnpike was blockaded by the enemy for 10 miles on the 13th instant. General Scammon had gone, on that day, to Fayetteville. The Ninety-first Ohio Regiment, he learned, had been left at Gauley, with some artillery and two companies of cavalry. I should hardly think that they meant serious invasion immediately. I am just starting a company to Colonel Pation.

JNO. ECHOLS,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN VIRGINIA,

Dublin, July 17, 1863.

Brigadier General JOHN ECHOLS, Union:

Your telegram received. Endeavor to ascertain from Colonel Patton if the enemy followed McCausland in amy force; if so, how far. I am particularly anxious to ascertain if the enemy's move in our front means serious invasion. Nothing further from McCausland. No news of interest to-day, excepting Lee's army reported to be this side of the Potomac.

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

STAUNTON, July 17, 1863.

WILLIAM B. MYERS, Lynchburg:

Arrived here this morning. All getting new and better guns; horses not arrived yet. Wharton left this morning; [J. Lyle] Clarke leaves to-morrow. Lee is on this side of the Potomac; Offered battle three days. Meade would not accept; let Lee off without attacking rear. Suppose Lee will cross again when ready, if enemy will not give battle on this side. Fight expected soon.

J. FLOYD KING.