War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0984 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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toward the White House, to ascertain, at least, the number of the enemy, and, if practicable, to strike them. The two regiments only sent.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

RICHMOND, July 8, 1863.

General D. H. HILL,

Williams' House:

Cooke's brigade, or at least a sufficient number to guard the bridge, should, I think, remain at the Junction.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

WILLIAMS' FARM, July 8, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

If the movement be made below, I ought to have Cooke. Jenkins and Ransom would be insufficient.

Respectfully,

D. H. HILL,

Major-General.

JULY 8, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War, C. S. A.:

I sent my aide down to Bottom's Bridge this morning, to report the condition of the road and flats beyond the bridge. He reports 3 1/2 feet of water on the flats beyond, and rapidly rising. The operator missed the figure, and made it 8 1/2.

Mr. [James A.] Reid says that the road now not being used, would be passable for a few guns and wagons, but would be impassable for a train. The worst place is 4 miles beyond Bottom's Bridge.

Two days of clear weather will put the roads in good condition.

If the President is urgent about sending aid to General Lee, I think one brigade, or possibly two, could be spared at once. If Meade has really been defeated, this force below will disappear. They can effect but little anyhow.

General Jenkins is anxious to go on at once.

Respectfully,

D. H. HILL,

Major-General.

JULY 8, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War, C. S. A.:

When I reached my tent last night, I found two notes, one from General Elzey and one from General Cooke, stating that the Yankees had gone back. I then telegraphed to you to know whether the movement ordered should still go on. To this no answer has been received, but, from indorsement upon the telegram sent by