War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0980 N. C. VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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[P. S.] - The citizens tell me there are thirty-three graves of Yankees in one place, 2 miles below this, and that they also carried off a number of dead in 2 wagons, besides 50 or 60 wounded in ambulances. I have sent to see if this be true, and will let you know.

JULY 7, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War:

The streams are all flooded and the roads impassable for artillery. No movement can be made to-day.

I called to see you yesterday, but found that you were at the President's. I will call to-day at any hour you may appoint.

The works on the left of the Brook turnpike are unconnected, consisting of detached batteries, which in many places afford no infantry shelter. As the city may have to be defended by local troops, the importance of infantry cover cannot be overestimated. The batteries on the River road and at Staples Mills are close to timber, and could not be used five minutes after the Yankee sharpshooters advanced. This timber should be felled, and rifle-pits constructed.

I would respectfully suggest that all the troops on the front line be put to work at once, and that all the engineer officers be sent out, minus their kid gloves, to superintend the works.

The works on the River road are very imperfect and incomplete.

The Army of The Pamunkey, or the Monkey army, will most likely change its base either for Washington or Petersburg. I must confess that I am more concerned for Petersburg than for Richmond, and always have been. General Wise should be instructed to move over there at the slightest alarm.

Colonel [John G.] Jones, Thirty-fifth North Carolina, made by my order a reconnaissance of the Yankee position at Talleysville. He found them in force, and was pursued slowly several miles, losing 1 man. The Chickahominy is very high, and Bottom's Bridge, I fear, will be washed away.

Very respectfully,

D. H. HILL,

Major-General.

P. S. - I returned to Dr. Williams' house last night, to be in telegraphic connection with Richmond and Meadow Station.

ENGINEER BUREAU,

July 7, 1863.

Colonel W. H. STEVENS,

Corps of Engineers, Provisional Army, Richmond, Va.:

COLONEL: In a letter of yesterday, General D. H. Hill represents to the Secretary of War that the works of the outer line, on the left of the Brook turnpike, are unconnected, consisting of detached batteries, which, in many places, afford no infantry shelter, and, as the city of Richmond may have to be defended by local troops, the importance of infantry cover cannot be overestimated.

He also states that the batteries on the River road and at Staples Mills are close to timber, and could not be held five minutes after the