War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0953 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - CONFEDERATE.

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side of the road as if an advance is intended. Two regiments of General Ransom's brigade are here and the balance on the way. Five pieces of artillery are also here.

W. P. SHINGLER,

Colonel, &c.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.

Richmond, July 2, 1863.

Colonel [E. D.] HALL, Junction, Va.:

What news of enemy this morning? I am about sending 500 more men to you. Do you need more re-enforcements, and of what kind? General Hill expected to send you Baker's cavalry and other aids.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.

HANOVER JUNCTION, July 2, 1863.

General ARNOLD ELZEY, Commanding:

Telegram from Milford says a large force of the enemy and fifteen pieces of artillery were at Rumford Academy last night; unable yet to say whether they intend to cross at Dunkirk, on their way east, or to come up on the North Anna, but think the former. I have a strong scout at Mangohick Church, which has not yet reporter. Will advise you as soon as their course is determined. Two deserters came in yesterday, and report a large force under General Dix.

E. D. HALL,

Colonel, Commanding.

HANOVER JUNCTION, July 2, 1863.

Honorable JAMES A. SEDDON:

The enemy have burned Nelson's Bridge over the Pamunkey, and have driven in and captured a company of cavalry at Mangohick. I have burned Morris' Bridge, collected about half of my force at the railroad bridge over North Anna, and will fight them there. Conscripts have come up without ammunition, and none can be gotten here.

E. D. HALL,

Colonel, Commanding.

WAR DEPARTMENT, C. S. A.,

Richmond, July 2, 1863.

Colonel [E. D.] HALL:

I have sent up 600 men, drawn from convalescents, for the purpose of relieving you, who, with your regiment, are much desired by General Hill. From your telegram, just received by General Elzey, I fear serious movement is being, or about to be, made against road in your vicinity. If so, it may be advisable for you to remain till such danger has passed or been encountered. Use your discretion, having in view the defense of your position as a primary consideration, and retaining, if you stay, the train until you feel it right to come down.

J. A. SEDDON,

Secretary of War.