War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0937 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

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[Inclosure.]

HEADQUARTERS, Kinston, June 22, 1863.

Major-General HILL:

GENERAL: Major Whitford states that he has learned from persons sent out from New Berne by the Yankees, that there are not over 6, 000 troops there, all told, and that there is no sign of an advance.

There is nothing new from the south side.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEO. G. GRATTAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. EIGHTH BATTALION, NORTH CAROLINA TROOPS, June 22, 1863.

Major General D. H. HILL:

GENERAL: I have been down in Carteret County, and went down the Sound and over on Bogue Bank as far as I could with safety. I saw only two small boats. From the best information I could get, I am satisfied there is no chance to take the fort or capture a boat on the Sound, though I do think that the enemy`s cavalry might be surprised, and I intend to try it when Major Cross returns, if things continue as they now are.

I am, general, with much respect, your obedient servant,

J. H. NETHERCUTT,

Major Eighth Battalion, North Carolina Troops.

GREENVILLE, N. C., June 23, 1863.

Major General D. H. HILL,

Comdg. Dept. of Virginia and North Carolina, Petersburg:

GENERAL: After relieving the cavalry pickets on the Roanoke by Colonel Martin`s men, and on this side by men from one of the regiments here, I have thought much of some other system which would not require two regiments to be furnishing details at the same time.

I should like to have a permanent garrison of two companies of artillery at Fort Brant. I could then change that regiment once a month for one here, and that regiment would furnish all the pickets between the Tar and the Roanoke. This would leave me two full regiments here as a movable force.

If I get the saddles asked for, I think the courier lines can be kept with boys and perhaps a few soldiers.

A prisoner of Colonel Martin`s regiment, recently paroled, living near Plymouth, went there on Sunday last to get permission from General Wessells to come out. He saw the general, and got the permit. He thinks there are about 2, 500 men. He says the men told him about 5, 000.

Nothing new anywhere to-night.

I am, general, yours, respectfully,

J. G. MARTIN,

Brigadier-General.