War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0929 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -CONFEDERATE.

Search Civil War Official Records

that there is any truth in the report. Colonel Tabb has been informed of the report and ordered to inquire into the truth of it. Any information from him will be forwarded to you at once.

Very respectfully,

GEORGE D. WISE,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

SALT SULPHUR SPRINGS, June 24, 1863.

Brigadier General JOHN ECHOLS,

Commanding, &c., Lewisburg:

GENERAL: I have just now received Colonel W. L. Jackson`s letter of yesterday, addressed to you, with your indorsement thereon. Send the two pieces of artillery and the ambulances to Colonel Jackson by all means, and send a cavalry escort with them. I will write to Colonel Jackson, and desire you to forward it, telling him to send an escort to meet them, and let yours return to you. I will either order up Stamps` battery or a section of the Otey Battery to Lewisburg. I do not apprehend any serious advance from the Kanawha. General Scammon, I believe, is fearing an advance from us. With the present state of alarm in Pennsylvania and Ohio, I do not think they can send re-enforcements to the Kanawha. I am detained here from a most provoking attack of sickness; had a sharp chill and fever yesterday, and feel wretchedly to- day. I hope, however, to be in Lewisburg, or rather in camp near there, day after to-morrow.

Very respectfully and truly, your obedient servant,

SAM. JONES,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF WESTERN VIRGINIA, Salt Sulphur Springs, June 24, 1863.

Colonel W. L. JACKSON,

Commanding, &c., near Huntersville:

COLONEL: I have just now received your letter of yesterday, addressed to Brigadier-General Echols, which the latter forwarded to me.

I have directed General Echols to send the two pieces of artillery and ambulances you want, and to send an escort of cavalry with them. I wish you to send an escort to meet them, and let the escort from Echols` command return. Your proposed movement meets my cordial approval. Indeed, you have only anticipated my wishes, for I desired the movement made, but could not order it without further information from Beverly. I thought it more than probable the enemy would withdraw all or part of their troops from Beverly, in view of affairs about Winchester and beyond the Potomac. Communicate with me at Lewisburg, where I hope to be to-day or tomorrow. I am detained here now on my way there by an attack of sickness. From Lewisburg I intend to go to your camp. As I cannot reach there now before you propose to start, I will defer my visit until I hear further from you. Of course, you will not delay your movement because of my proposed visit. Go on, and I trust you will meet with entire success. Send me any information you think

59 R R-VOL XXVII, PT III