War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0785 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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General Halleck replied to my proposition that he would send me a decision on my proposition as soon as he could get it. None as yet has come.

Very respectfully, &c.,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HDQRS. FIRST BRIG., SECOND DIV., ELEVENTH CORPS,

Near Warrenton Junction, Va., July 30, 1863.

Brigadier General A. VON STEINWEHR,

Commanding Second Division, Eleventh Corps:

GENERAL: The unfortunate event at Chancellorsville has cast a prejudice upon our corps which all subsequent efforts seem unable to destroy.

The officers and men of my brigade on that day behaved with great bravery, as you yourself have seen, and have always done their duty, yet they also suffer under this prejudice. It is, therefore, my opinion that consolidation of this corps with some other corps would be in the interest of the service. If, however, I may be allowed to express we remain in your division, and that this division remain in the corps commanded by Major-General Howard.

I have the honor to be, general, you obedient servant,

A. BUSCHBECK,

Colonel, Comdg., Firs Brig., Second Div., Eleven Corps.

HDQRS. SECOND BRIG., SECOND DIV., ELEVENTH CORPS,

Near Warrenton Junction, Va., July 30, 1863.

General A. VON STEINWEHR,

Commanding Second Division, Eleventh Corps:

GENERAL: I have the honor to beg your consideration to a few expressions in respect to the brigade under my command, its relations to the Eleventh Corps, and its wishes as regards yourself and General Howard.

Since the unfortunate affair near Chancellorsville, it is undeniable that the reputation of the corps has been such as to involve in reproach and mortification all parties connected with it.

Although the Second Brigade was in no way responsible for the occurrences which brought the corps into disrepute, having been at the time detached and on a reconnaissance in connection with Birney's division of the Third Corps, nevertheless the men and officers of the brigade are painfully impressed with the impossibility of their avoiding participation in the sigma which rest upon the whole body. Believing that many unjust aspersions have been cast, not only upon innocent members, but upon the whole corps, and that it will continue to be the but of ridicule for irresponsible newspaper correspondents, and the scapegoat, perhaps, for all reverses, I am convinced that a change of organization would be of very great advantage, and promote in a high degree the good of the service. Such a consummation would dispel the despondency and discouragement which are unmistakably manifest in those whose patriotism un-

50 R R-VOL XXVII, PT III