War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0751 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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General Ingalls is with me. He was not able to find any of his men at or near White Plains. I will send him out again in a short time.

H. HAUPT.

WAR DEPARTMENT, July 22, 1863.

General RUFUS KING,

Commanding:

I have just returned from White Plains, on Manassas Gap Railroad, where I intended to join General Meade. From present indications, the depot will still be on the Potomac, at Berlin and Harper's Ferry. I sent forward Captains Peirce and Pitkin yesterday with wagon trains and contraband force to the proposed depot at White Plains and Warrenton; it will not be proper now that they go any farther until otherwise ordered. They must be at or near Centreville. Generals Halleck and Meigs suggest that I ask you to send express to them at once, directing their return to Fairfax, to await further orders. May I ask you to have this done to-day? It was reported that General Gregg was at Centreville last night. Please reply to me here.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Brigadier-General, and Chief Quartermaster.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA, Fort Monroe, Va., July 22, 1863.

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.:

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that from certain private sources, too indefinite, perhaps, to make a report on (definite enough for me to form a hope on if not a judgment), I learn that North Carolina Union people are prepared, on certain contingencies, to show themselves more plainly, and to make a bold stroke for the severance of the State from the Southern Confederacy. I have taken no steps in this matter, but should it be your wish to ascertain the force, importance, and probabilities of this move, I believe it can be done without compromising the Government in the least, and that the proper steps can be taken to encourage and aid the effort. For this, among other reasons, I wish to send General Naglee to North Carolina in command, and to have him promoted for this purpose. He is informed as to the channels of information, and as to the ways and means to act, and, with his ability, would, I have no doubt, be eminently successful. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. FOSTER,

Major-General, Commanding.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 22, 1863-10. 25 p. m.

Major-General FOSTER, Fort Monroe:

You will please telegraph all the information you can obtain from time to time, from newspapers you can procure,

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.