War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0681 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, July 13, 1863-9 p. m.

Brigadier General B. F. KELLEY,

Fairview, Md.:

Move up upon the enemy's flank and rear, and attack and harass him wherever you can. If you can reach his crossing, annoy him as much as possible.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HEADQUARTERS DEFENSES SOUTH OF THE POTOMAC, July 13, 1863.

Lieutenant-Colonel TAYLOR,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Dept. of Washington:

On the receipt of your communication of the 11th instant, I sent a letter to Colonel Hall, commanding at Fort Ethan Allen, who sent about 200 infantry and 15 cavalry, as much as he could spare, to Mrs. Jones' farm. They remained out all night, but no traces of any enemy were found, not even a horse-track, and reliable citizens in tht neighborhood had no intelligence of any rebels being in the vicinity.

Very respectfully.

G. A. DE RUSSY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

BALTIMORE, July 13, 1863.

(Received 9. 30 p. m.)

Honorable E. M STANTON,

SECRETARY of WAR:

You have doubtless heard already of the damage to the Washington branch road by the recent unprecedented storm. We have a very heavy force, under charge of our principal officers, upon the line, doing all that is possible for its earliest practicable restoration. We trust to have it opened through to-morrow a. m. Such was the extreme severity of the lightning that four magnets were destroyed at Washington Junction at different periods during the storm. The obstruction upon the main stem were removed very promptly, and by report from Supervisor [Alexander Diffey, dated Frederick at 5. 45 p. m., we learn that trains are doing well on main stem. All trains that left Washington yesterday have arrived at destination. Artillery and their horses are being unloaded at Monocacy. Troops are being unloaded at Frederick promptly on their arrival, and can be returned to Baltimore. No troops have gone to Sandy Hook since Saturday. Everything that is possible shall be done at all points to accomplish the best results. The damages to bridges and track on Washington road is serious, but will be all overcome, as stated.

JOHN. W. GARRETT.

U. S. S. SEYMOUR, James River, July 13, 1863.

Major General JOHN. A. DIX,

Commanding Seventh Army Corps, Fort Monroe:

GENERAL: There are no casemates to Fort Powhatan; no guns mounted, and no garrison. This I discovered by a reconnaissance