War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0611 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 8, 1863-11 a. m.

Major-General COUCH,

Harrisburg, Pa.:

Your views in regard to repair of railroad are approved. I think that all the available forces in your department should be thrown forward to assist General Meade. They can be of no use at present elsewhere.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HARRISBURG, PA., July 8, 1863.

(Received 5. 20 p. m.)

General HALLECK:

Everything is being thrown down that can be to join Meade, excepting my forces at Loudon, which have been ordered into Clear Spring country, to keep the rebels from seizing stock, flour, &c., to feed themselves. In my judgment they cannot be better employed. That force has taken 700 prisoners, two pieces of artillery, and 100 wagons up to this time, as well as help drive in their trains, that have now been six days without forage.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.

HARRISBURG, July 8, 1863-11 p. m.

General G. K. WARREN:

My headquarters will probably be at Chambersburg to-morrow. I am putting troops in the Valley as fast as railroad can do it, having had some ten regiments organized and equipped in last ten days. I will endeavor to effect a junction with Smith and your army.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.

WAYNESBOROUGH, July 8, 1863-4 p. m.

General S. WILLIAMS:

My command arrived here to-day, and, finding General Neill here, I have encamped so as to render him all possible assistance till definite instructions are sent to me. My command is an incoherent mass, and, if it is to join the Army of the Potomac, I would suggest that the brigades, five in number, be attached to old divisions, and thus disperse the greenness. They cannot be maneuvered, and as a command it is quite helpless, excepting in the kind of duty I have kept them on in the mountains. I have here about 4, 000 men, and I suppose 2, 000 have straggled away since I left Carlisle. General Knipe is the only one I have with me who is at all serviceable, and he is anxious to get back to his own brigade in the Twelfth Corps. I am utterly powerless, without aid and in the short time allotted, to infuse any discipline into these troops, and for the reasons given above make the suggestion as being for the best interests of the service.

Very respectfully,

WM. F. SMITH,

Brigadier-General.