War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0593 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -UNION.

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be reloaded when the movement is determined upon? Prompt return of our train men and machinery is vital to accomplish continuous large work.

J. W. GARRETT.

HARRISBURG, PA., July 7, 1863-12. 20 a. m.

Major-General MEADE, Gettysburg:

Your dispatch of 6 p. m. received. I don't fancy that Lee will attack here. The river is rising rapidly, and he could not cross. I believe that Gregg is following them toward Greencastle, and I suppose that Smith would aid him from near Cashtown. If you have ordered him to Gettysburg, it is all right. I can throw 4, 000, perhaps, down the Valley to-morrow.

I have given directions to find out, if possible, to-night if the rebels are retreating toward Hancock, hoping that they had but one bridge, which French destroyed. In case they go west, as the Potomac is not fordable, I shall endeavor to throw 5, 000 mounted men from Bedford on their flanks. But if you prefer my troops with your army, only intimate it, as my heart and means are at your disposal. Some think that the New York militia will not march into Maryland. I don't know how that will be. We are picking up a good many stragglers.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.

HARRISBURG, PA., July 7, 1863-10 a. m.

General WILLIAMS,

Adjutant-General, Army of the Potomac:

Up to last night my orders to Smith to join you had failed to reach him, on account of couriers being captured of lost in the mountains. In case he joins you, please relieve him, as he returns by my order to join me. He reports the enemy still working back through the passes, on what he calls the eastern slope. He had received no orders from you. In carrying out previous orders, will work down through the gaps on the Cumberland Valley side.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.

GREENWOOD, July 7, 1863-1. 20 p. m.

Major-General COUCH:

GENERAL: The order of General [Meade], requiring me to move to Gettysburg, is countermanded, and I am now moving in the direction of Waynesborough. My supplies are not all up yet, and, if possible, a train should be on the road for me in the direction of Waynesborough. The mountain roads and wet weather have left may of my men shoeless. Can you send me 1, 000 pairs at once?

WM. F. SMITH,

Brigadier-General.

38 R R-VOL XXVII, PT III