War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0579 CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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If you can spare Smith, I should like to have him, so soon as the movements of the enemy indicate a force to be no longer necessary at this point. My headquarters to-night will he here; to-morrow night Frederick. The army is now in motion.

Very respectfully, &c.,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 6, 1863.

General WILLIAM F. SMITH:

The major-general commanding directs that you proceed at once to Gettysburg and occupy the country, so as to protect the hospitals of our own and the rebel wounded, and have established such general hospitals for the latter, and exercise such surveillance over them as will prevent any of the attendants from returning to the enemy. You will communicate with General Neill, now watching the retreat of the enemy through the Fairfield Gap. Report your arrival here. Headquarters to-morrow evening will be at Frederick.

By command of Major-General Meade:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Indorsement.]

NEWMAN'S PASS, July 7, 1863.

I inclose the order of General Meade, under which I am acting. I think it of great importance that the Cumberland Valley Railroad should be pushed on with vigor to supply the army from H.

WM. F. SMITH.

BATTLE-FIELD OF GETTYSBURG, July 6, 1863.

General WILLIAM F. SMITH:

DEAR FRIEND: Your orders to stop here are to provide for any contingencies, for a day or so, and General Meade wishes very much for you to follow on and join him as soon as developments show no necessity for a force here, which is even now apparent, but not so when the order was sent to you.

We are all much pleased with the way you behaved at the Harrisburg brigade and Carlisle. It was a great help to us. We hope made this place a sore subject of mention to Southern pride. I hope you are well, and that I am to see you soon.

Yours,

G. K. WARREN, .

NEWMAN'S GAP, On Gettysburg Turnpike, July 6, 1863-7 p. m.

General D. N. COUCH:

GENERAL: I encamp here to-night, having made 14 miles through the mountains. If nothing happens, I shall move to-morrow toward the next gap south, and so on up the Cumberland Valley, holding