War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0558 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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General Sykes' position, I must leave to you the selection of the corps to occupy Emmitsburg.

Please report by an intelligent staff officer how you comply with these orders-one who can designate on the map the position of the corps on the Fairfield road. Let me know what subsistence you have.

Very respectfully, &c.,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General, Commanding.

SIGNAL STATION, July 6, 1863-9 a. m.

Captain NORTON:

The column of infantry reported moving along the Fairfield road has all passed. The road has been empty for the last half hour.

P. AND C.,

Signal Officers.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 6, 1863-9 a. m.

General [SEDGWICK]:

Your dispatch, proposing to move to Emmitsburg, is received. I cannot at present approve of this proposition. I advised you last night that you could call to your support Newton and Birney, who were under your orders. Newton reporting to me that he and Birney had moved under your orders on the Emmitsburg road (and your dispatch saying you had not sent orders to them), I immediately directed them to half, to report their positions to you, and await your orders. I have also directed General Howard (who commands the Fifth and Eleventh Corps) to post one of his corps at Emmitsburg, and the other on same road leading to Fairfield, from whence it can be thrown up there. With this disposition of three corps under your immediate command, and two within support, together with the fact just reported that our cavalry have passed through Cashtown without opposition, and were at Caledonia Iron Works (northwest from Fairfield some 11 miles), I am of the opinion that you are in a measure secure on your right flank and rear, and, therefore, can examine the front.

All evidence seems to show a movement to Hagerstown and the Potomac. No doubt the principal force is between Fairfield and Hagerstown; but I apprehend they will be likely to let you alone, if you let them alone. Let me know the result of Neill's operations-whether they retire before him, or threaten to push him and you. Send out pickets well on your left flank' reconnoiter in all directions, and let me know the result.

This is all the instruction I can now give you. Whenever I am satisfied that the main body is retiring from the mountains, I shall continue my flank movement.

I am going to direct Couch to move down the Cumberland Valley to threaten their rear.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.