War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0553 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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management of the Government and its generals and an eulogy of McClellan. The prevailing sentiment in Democratic circles is that the complete defeat of Lee's army will be the overthrow of the Democratic party on the Copperhead platform, and Meade's victory is, therefore, not hailed with the universal joy with which it would naturally inspire the hearts of a patriotic people. Tom Scott and Edgar Thomson will find it harder than ever to manufacture public sentiment to bear upon the President for the restoration of McClellan. They would have been far more usefully and patriotically employed in persuading the people to shoulder muskets and fight the enemy instead of signing petitions.

P. H. WATSON.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, D. C., July 5, 1863-8 p. m.

Major-General DIX, Fort Monroe:

Dispatches from the front state that Lee's army is in full retreat across the mountains.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

FORT MONROE, July 5, 1863. (Received 5. 30 p. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Many thanks for the glorious new. I am watching with great anxiety to hear from Brigadier-General Getty. I think he made the attack last night on the Fredericksburg Railroad bridge. Will telegraph the General-in-Chief the moment I hear from him.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

WASHINGTON, July 5, 1863.

Major General J. G. FOSTER,

Commanding, &c., New Berne:

GENERAL: Your dispatch of June 30 is received. Returns should be sent by sea and not by the interior route.

The letter of Jeff. Davis to Lee, which has been sent to you by General Dix, will show that nearly all the rebel troops have been withdrawn from North Carolina.

If Lee should receive another severe pounding before he crosses the Potomac, or his army should be seriously compromised, more rebel troops must be drawn from the south. I think, therefore, you will have an opportunity to do the rebels much injury, even with your small force. Increase your cavalry as much as you can by capturing horses in the enemy's country. In Maryland and Pennsylvania, they take every animal they require.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.