War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0542 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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division wounded and taken prisoner and held near the battle-field of the First Corps:

Yesterday they sent their wounded, filling about 500 wagons, ambulances, hay wagons, &c., piled in as thick as they could be, accompanied and followed by crowds so wounded as to be able to walk, on the road to Chambersburg, saying they were going to Winchester; guarded by two regiments of cavalry, one full battery, and many injured caissons, limbers, and guns. No provision train with them. This morning (the 5th), at about 6 a. m., they sent two more regiments of cavalry, several squads of cavalry, and one battery, with a large lot of stragglers; took the same road, saying they were going to millerstown. There was also seen a number of our wagons, said to have been captured near Washington by Hampton.

They are very short of food, but say they have a large amount of ammunition in their train. They seemed to be in no great hurry to get away, saying, that if we followed them, they were ready for us and if we did not molest them, they would cross quietly.

All the main body, trains, and artillery marched for Millerstown. Their left wing and part of their center consisted of about 40, 000 men, judging from careful calculation as was possible under the circumstances. They are thought to have taken 5, 000 of our men prisoners. A rebel colonel said their loss in all was probably from 20, 000 to 25, 000.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHARLES E. LIVINGSTON,

Lieutenant-Colonel, and Assistant Adjutant-General.

ORDERS.] HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 5, 1863.

The artillery from the Reserve, now serving with corps, will be returned to the Reserve.

The chief of artillery will assign batteries from the Reserve to army corps, to replace losses and deficiencies, upon application setting forth the number and kind required. The assignments so made will not exceed the proportions to the infantry arm heretofore established.

The chief quartermaster will take horses from the teams of the army, to supply deficiencies in the artillery. The horses taken can be replaced by mules, and by the reduction of six-mule teams to four mules.

By command of Major-General Meade:

[DANL. BUTTERFIELD,]

Major-General, Chief of Staff.

CIRCULAR.] HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 5, 1863.

The major-general commanding enjoins it upon all corps commanders to be very careful in [expending] their ammunition, both artillery and infantry.

We are now drawing upon our reserve trains, and it is of the highest importance that no ammunition be exhausted unless there is reason to believe that its use will produce a decided effect upon the enemy.

By command of Major-General Meade:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.