War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0518 N. C., VA. W. VA., MD. PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

Search Civil War Official Records

pressed yesterday in regard to the retreat of the enemy. General Buford will probably pass through South Mountain to-morrow p. m. from this side.

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General, and Chief of Staff.

JULY 4, 1863-10. 20 a. m.

Major-General FRENCH, Frederick:

More recent developments indicate that the enemy may have retired to take a new position and await an attack from us. The general countermands his dispatch requiring you to reoccupy Maryland Heights and seize the South Mountain passes, resuming the instructions contained in the dispatch of July 3, making your movements contingent upon of the enemy.

Please acknowledge this.

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General, Chief of Staff.

(Copy to General Halleck.)

HARRISBURG, PA., July 4, 1863. (Received, War Department, 10 a. m.)

General GEORGE G. MEADE:

I have most reliable information that Lee's force, which passed Hagerstown, was not outside 80, 000, of which 12, 000 were horse-men.

D. N. COUCH.

HARRISBURG, PA., July 4, 1863. (Received, War Department, 1 p. m.)

Major-General MEADE, Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

Everything is sent forward, excepting guards to hold in check at fords, bridges, &c. A corps of 3, 000 men can force the Susquehanna at any moment in the present stage of water.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.

HARRISBURG, PA., July 4, 1863. (Received, War Department, 6 p. m.)

General GEORGE G. MEADE:

General [W. F.] Smith's advance, in the mountain passes beyond Mount Holly, met 2, 000 paroled prisoners from your army, under escort. Smith, being discovered, received the prisoners. I will sent them to camp at West Chester.

D. N. COUCH.