War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0506 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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seriously crippled; in fact, we will have to come to almost a stand-still. What is to be done?

May we not ask to have an order issued at once, exempting the men in our employ from military service, in view of the absolute necessity of their remaining at their railroad duties, which, as you know, at this time are essentially and almost exclusively a Government affair?

W. P. SMITH.

BALTIMORE, July 3, 1863.

Major-General HALLECK, General-in-Chief, Washington:

The Forty-third Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry has been sent by General Dix to report to me for duty. The men are dissatisfied, demoralized, and, I fear, will be good for nothing if they stay. Their colonel seems to have no confidence in them. Shall I send them on home to be mustered out?

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General.

HARRISBURG, July 3, 1863-9 a. m.

Colonel PIERCE, Bloody Run:

Lee has been fighting Meade. Cant' you put forward your cavalry toward Chambersburg, and harass his rear, keeping a sharp lookout? No time is to be lost. So far, our people have the advantage. Put your whole column, infantry and cavalry, in motion toward McMount Union or Perry County.

Telegraph me at different points where you are.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.

HARRISBURG, PA., July 3, 1863-9. 30 a. m. (Received 10. 20 a. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

Jefferson Davis was undoubtedly at Greencastle yesterday.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.

HARRISBURG, July 3, 1863.

Colonel PIERCE, Bloody Run, or elsewhere:

Move on with your whole force to the passes near McConnellsburg, and as near Chambersburg and Mercersburg as possible.

My cavalry were near Chambersburg yesterday, and so were the rebels. Make every exertion to harass, and show of force.

I think Meade will whip them to-morrow, and we must help him every way. Push on at all hazards.

Send this dispatch. Notify me where you are.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.