War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0475 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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WASHINGTON, D. C., July 1, 1863.

Brigadier General W. F. BARRY, Washington, D. C.:

GENERAL: Your two batteries at Bladensburg will immediately move forward to Baltimore. The march should be made as expeditiously as possible, without injury to the men and horses. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General- in-Chief.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 1, 1863-12. 30 p. m.

Major-General SCHENCK, Baltimore, Md.:

There can be very little rebel force between General Meade and Baltimore. You will do everything in your power to preserve the railroad to Frederick, as that may soon become again the base of supplies. If you have no communication by telegraph with General Meade, send messages by trusty men from ends of line.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

BALTIMORE, MD., July 1, 1863-1. 30 p. m. (Received 2. 10 p. m.)

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

I think there is no rebel force whatever now between General Meade and myself. I sent up General Kane last evening to Westminster with an escort, and sent two couriers in the night with dispatches. Lee, I think, is either massing his troops, or making a general retreat toward the Cumberland Valley; most likely the former. They are so near that I shall not be surprised if a battle comes on to-day. I will look to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to Frederick.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS EIGHTH ARMY CORPS, Baltimore, July 1, 1863.

Major HOUNSFIELD,

Comdg. Fifth Delaware Infantry, Havre de Grace, Md.:

I have reliable information that the whole rebel army has withdrawn southwestward toward Gettysburg or Chambersburg. Thus there is little to be apprehended at present on our line, excepting it may be from guerrillas or traitors of the neighborhood, who may try their hand at bridge burning. These you must repel and punish. Some of the alarm on the line has, perhaps, been occasioned by our own cavalry, which I have had for two or three days scouting the country through Bel Air up to Conowingo Bridge, and covering the approach to you. I have ordered a company of cavalry to march from Bel Air to Havre de Grace. Your lieutenant, [Clement] Reeves, will return this morning, and report to you fully.

ROBT. C. SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.