War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0467 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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well out and to the front, so that the first movement of the enemy may be known at once and communicated. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. W. MOSELEY,

Captain, and Aide-de-Camp.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, July 1, 1863-7 p. m.

Commanding Officer Fifth Corps:

The major-general commanding directs that you move up to Gettysburg at one upon receipt of this order, if not already ordered to do so by General Slocum. The present prospect is that our general engagement must be there. Communicate with General Slocum, under whose directions you are placed by the orders of this morning. The general had supposed that General Slocum would have ordered you up. Very respectfully, &c.,

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major- General, Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Taneytown, July 1, 1863-7. 30 p. m.

Commanding Officer at Emmitsburg:

The major-general commanding directs that the division of General Sickles' corps ordered to remain at Emmitsburg move up to join their corps at the field in the vicinity of Gettysburg with the greatest dispatch. The latest information from the field, at 5. 25, would indicate that the enemy occupy Gettysburg, and our forces are in position in rear of the town, on the road to Taneytown. The greatest care must be taken in getting on the proper road. It is believed that, after crossing Marsh Creek, there is a road leading into the Gettysburg and Taneytown road, in rear of our line. The general directs that you take care that you do not come in collision with any force of the enemy in moving up. He expects the division to be up by daylight to-morrow. Very respectfully, &c.,

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major- General, Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS, Taneytown, July 1, 1863-7. 30 p. m.

Major-General SEDGWICK:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs me to say that a general battle seems to be impending to-morrow at Gettysburg; that it is of the utmost importance that your command should be up. He directs that you stop all trains that impede your progress, or turn them out of the road. Your march will have to be a forced one to reach the scene of action, where we shall probably be largely outnumbered without your presence.