War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0436 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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NEW YORK, June 30, 1863.

(Received 3. 30 p. m.)

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

President of the United States:

Our citizens generally have great confidence in the military capacity of General Franklin, and think he can render good service at the North. He is willing to serve wherever he can be useful. Will you not detain him for duty here?

WALDO HUTCHINS

PROSPER M. WETMORE.

JOS. WADSWORTH.

CONTINENTAL HOTEL, Philadelphia, June 30, 1863.

(Received 5. 40 p. m.)

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

President of the United States:

Yours received. Will answer fully by mail. A. K. McCLURE,

PHILADELPHIA, June 30, 1863.

(Received 11. 05 a. m.)

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

President of the United States:

SIR: Have been twenty-four hours hoping to hasten the organization of troops. It seems impossible to do so to an extent at all commensurate with the emergency. Our people are paralyzed for want of confidence and leadership, and, unless they can be inspired with hope, we shall fail to do anything worthy of our State or Government. I am fully persuaded that to call McClellan to a command here would be the best thing that could be done. He could rally troops from Pennsylvania, and I am well assured that New York and New Jersey would also respond to his call with great alacrity. With his efficiency in organizing men, and the confidence he would inspire, early and effective relief might be afforded us, and great service rendered to the Army of the Potomac. Unless we are in some way rescued from the hopelessness now prevailing, we shall have practically an inefficient conscription, and be powerless to help either ourselves or the National Government. After free consultation with trusted friends of the Administration, I hesitate not to urge that McClellan be called here. He can render us and you the best service, and in the present crisis no other consideration should prevail. Without military success we can have no political success, no matter who commands. In this request I reflect what seems to be an imperative necessity rather than any preference of my own.

A. K. McCLURE.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, Washington,

June 30, 1863-10. 55 a. m.

Governor PARKER, Trenton, N. J.:

Your dispatch of yesterday received. I really think the attitude of the enemy's army in Pennsylvania present us the best opportunity