War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0434 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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HARRISBURG, PA., June 30, 1863.

(Received 5. 30 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

As telegraphed previously, part of the rebel forces, if not all, have fallen back toward Chambersburg, passing Shippensburg last night in great haste. I expect every moment to hear that my cavalry, under General smith, has reoccupied Carlisle. My latest information is that Early, with his 8, 000 men, went toward Gettysburg or Hanover, saying they expected to fight a great battle there. At Carlisle they said they were not going to be outflanked by Hooker.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.

HARRISBURG, PA., June 30, 1863.

(Received 6. 15 p. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War:

Scouts report a force of rebels having left Carlisle this morning by the Baltimore pike, and that Ewell, from York, went northwesterly, which would unite their two forces.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.

HARRISBURG, PA., June 30, 1863-9 p. m.

(Received 12 midnight.)

ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

President:

The rebel infantry force left Carlisle early this morning, on the Baltimore pike. Cavalry still on this side of that town. Early, with 8, 000, left York this morning; went westerly or northwesterly. Rebels at York and Carlisle yesterday a good deal agitated about some news they had received. I telegraphed news to General Meade, care of the Secretary of War.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.

HARRISBURG, June 30, 1863-7 p. m.

General LORENZO THOMAS:

MY DEAR GENERAL: We need some experienced artillerists to man a couple of batteries for immediate service in the field. There are organized companies, with horses trained, harness, and all necessary equipments at Fort Hamilton, New York Harbor, without guns. We have plenty of guns and ammunition here. Won't you telegraph General Wool to load them up to-night, and send here by the Allentown route from Elizabethtown point? The steamer from the fort can deliver them there direct. I know General Smith wants them. Wool, you know, will not send them without positive orders. As our force here might be of great service to Meade, in rear of Lee's army, you will appreciate the value of two good batteries being on hand to-morrow. I make this communication without consultation, and to you personally. Telegraph to-night, and send me [letter] by bearer.

Yours, truly,

THOMAS A. SCOTT.