War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0422 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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pike, and may be there still. No enemy at Waynesborough this morning at 8 a. m. Pickets of the enemy were 4 miles beyond Waynesborough, and are said to have approached somewhat nearer the town. Whether infantry or cavalry, is not reported. No enemy moving toward Emmitsburg, on the pike. The enemy occupy Millerstown (or Fairfield). My informant heard there was a skirmish there this morning. He states further that on corps (A. P. Hill's) had sixty-eight and another eighteen pieces of artillery. It took the corps of A. P. Hill from 4. 30 p. m. until after 10 p. m. to pass through, including the transportation (which followed each its brigade). Very respectfully,

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

JUNE 30, 1863.

General HOWARD:

Buford sends reliable information that the enemy occupies Chambersburg in force, and that they are moving down from Cashtown.

JOHN F. REYNOLDS.

[P. S.]-I am taking position behind Marsh Creek.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 30, 1863-12. 45 p. m.

Commanding Officer Third Corps:

The major-general commanding directs that you move your corps up to Emmitsburg. You will take three days' rations in haversacks, 60 rounds of ammunition, and your ambulances. Your trains will remain parked here until further orders. General Reynolds' First Corps, and General Howard's Eleventh Corps, are between Emmitsburg and Gettysburg. General Reynolds will command the left wing, consisting of the First, Eleventh, and Third Corps. The enemy are reported to be in force in Gettysburg. You will move without delay. You will report to General Reynolds, and throw out strong pickets on the roads from Emmitsburg to Greencastle and Chambersburg. Mechanicstown, on your left, is occupied by a brigade of cavalry, with whom you will communicate.

Very respectfully, &c.,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 30, 1863-1 p. m.

Commanding Officer Second Corps:

General Meade directs that you move your troops up to Taneytown, cutting across the rear of Sykes', so as not to interfere with his movements, if this can be done, leaving your trains behind, to follow when the reads are clear. Sixty rounds of ammunition and three days' provisions with your men. Your ammunition trains and