War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0415 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -- UNION.

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the present position of the army, viz, the First Corps, Eleventh Corps, and Third Corps. He will make such dispositions and give such orders as circumstances may require, and report from time to time to the commanding general. By order of Major-General Meade:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

(Copy to commanding officer Eleventh Army Corps.)

CIRCULAR.] Headquarters Army of the Potomac,

June 30, 1863.

The commanding general requests that previous to the engagement soon expected with the enemy, corps and all other commanding officers address their troops, explaining to them briefly the immense issues involved in the struggle. The enemy are on our soil. The whole country now looks anxiously to this army to deliver it from the presence of the foe. Our failure to do so will leave us no such welcome as the swelling of millions of hearts with pride an joy at our success would give to every soldier of this army. Homes, firesides, and domestic altars are involved. The army has fought well heretofore; it is believed that it will fight more desperately and bravely than over if is addressed in fitting terms. Corps and other commanders are authorized to order the instant death of any soldier who fails in his duty at this hour. By command of Major-General Meade:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Headquarters Army of the Potomac,

June 30, 1863.

Commanding Officer Eleventh Corps: The commanding general desires you to be informed that, from present information, Longstreet and Hill are at Chambersburg, partly toward Gettysburg; Ewell at Carlisle and York. Movements indicate a disposition to advance from Chambersburg to Gettysburg. General Couch telegraphs, 29th, his opinion that the enemy's operations on the Susquehanna are more to prevent co-operation with this army than offensive. The general believes he has relieved Harrisburg and Philadelphia, and now desires to look to his own army, and assume position for offensive or defensive, as occasion requires, or rest to the troops. It is not his desire to wear the troops out by excessive fatigue and marches, and thus unfit them for the work they will be called upon to perform. Vigilance, energy, and prompt response to the orders from headquarters are necessary, and the personal attention of corps commanders must be given to reduction of impedimenta. The orders and movements from these headquarters must be carefully and confidentially preserved, that they do not fail into the enemy's hands. By order to General Meade:

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.