War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0398 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

June 29, 1863-5. 35 p. m.

Commanding Officer Sixth Corps:

Your staff officer has arrived here, reporting that you will not be able to reach New Windsor to-night. I am directed by the commanding general to say that it is of the utmost importance that you should move early to-morrow morning, and, with your left at Westminster, occupy the railroad terminating at that place.

Very respectfully, &c.,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 29, 1863.

Captain [ROBERT E.] DUVALL:

The major-general commanding directs that, on the receipt of this, you fall back with the artillery and cavalry you have with you until you meet with our cavalry force, now supposed to be in your vicinity, and that you accompany the same until further orders. Very respectfully,

S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS TWELFTH CORPS, Woodsborough,

June 29, 1863-6. 20 p. m.

Major General GEORGE G. MEADE,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: Owing to the very serious delay I have met with to-day from trains which I think do not belong on this road, I shall not be able to get beyond Double Pipe Creek to-night with my command. When I left Frederick, there were a great number of men form every corps in the army lying about the streets, beastly drunk. I think it important that a cavalry force should be sent back to bring them up.

Yours, respectfully,

H. W. SLOCUM,

Major-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, June 29, 1863.

General M. R. PATRICK,

Provost-Marshal-General:

The major-general commanding directs that you take immediate and prompt measures to have all the stragglers and drunken soldiers driven out of Frederick and to their commands, using your cavalry for this purpose.

Very respectfully, &c.,

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General, and Chief of Staff.