War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0397 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -- UNION.

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HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION, CAVALRY CORPS, June 29, 1863.

This communication was written at 8 o'clock this morning, and will explain the delay of Colonel McIntosh starting. Two corps of infantry moved on the road from Ridgeville to Jewsburg, and in advance of my brigades.

D. McM. GREGG,

Brigadier General Vols., Commanding Second Division.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST ARMY CORPS, Emmitsburg, Md.,

June 29, 1863-3. 15 p. m.

Major-General BUTTERFIELD,

Chief of Staff, Army of the Potomac:

GENERAL: I have the honor to report that I have reached this place, having ridden ahead of the column, from Mechanicsville. [Edward] Hopkins, a scout of Sharpe's, has just returned from Gettysburg, with a statement of affairs in that quarter yesterday. Early's division passed there in the direction of York, and the other division (Gordon's, I think), with the trains, was in the Valley, and moved along a road nearer the mountains. Another division (Rodes') of Ewell's was up by Carlisle, and Hill (A. P.) was said to be moving up through Greencastle, in the direction of Chambersburg. The cavalry with Early was sent off to Hanover Junction, and up the railroad to York. I sent Hopkins to you or Sharpe, at Middleburg, and merely give you my recollection from a hasty reading of his dispatch, without going into particulars, for fear he may miss you. They had a skirmish with the enemy's scouts, sent through the pass here yesterday, which resulted in the capture of 13 of the rebels by Captain [A. M.] Hunter, of the Maryland cavalry, whom I met to-day on his return to Knoxville. I was informed that some changes had taken place, but could not [ascertain] definitely whether the force at Harper's Ferry to which he belongs had moved or not. This cavalry of the enemy appears to be watching this pass from the other side. A citizen reports that information was conveyed by citizens from Frederick to Emmitsburg that four corps were there yesterday, and it was believed that they would move up on parallel roads in this direction from Mechanicsville. I have and will try from here to send some citizens over in the Valley to Waynesborough to-night, to learn what they can of the enemy.

JOHN F. REYNOLDS,

Major-General.

SIGNAL STATION, Upton's Hill,

June 29, 1863.

Colonel ALBERT J. MYER,

Signal Officer, Washington:

I have just arrived from a scout to Dranesville. No enemy there. Rebel cavalry left yesterday morning; went toward Seneca Ford; had six pieces of artillery; no wagon train. Stuart said to be in command. Will report in full by courier. All quiet in this place.

J. H. SPENCER,

Captain, Signal Officer.