War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0379 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -- UNION.

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OFFICE OF THE CHIEF QUARTERMASTER,

Camp near Frederick City, June 28, 1863.

General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-Genera, Washington:

The cavalry that left before the wagon train has not been heard of here. Had the train been guarded by any ordinary force, the result would have been the same. Its starting was ill-timed and unfortunate. There is a powerful force of rebel cavalry between here and Rockville. Our own cavalry is in motion, and the army will march in the morning. We must and will fight to the end.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Brigadier-General, Chief Quartermaster.

WASHINGTON, D. C., June 28, 1863-8. 45 p. m.

General R. INGALLS,

Chief Quartermaster, Army of the Potomac:

I have just seen General Meigs, who says there is to be an investigation concerning the loss of that wagon train. The ground of complaint is that the train was sent without an escort.

C. G. SAWTELLE,

Lieutenant-Colonel, and Quartermaster.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington City,

June 28, 1863-10. 30 p. m.

General INGALLS,

Chief Quartermaster, Army of the Potomac:

The cavalry, some 300 in number, remounted and started out yesterday. Had two skirmishes with Fitzhugh Lee's brigade, one on the River road, the other near Rockville. They returned with a loss of about 16, saving their own baggage train, and are in camp at Tennallytown. Had this cavalry escorted the wagon train and behaved as well as they did with their own, they would have saved it.

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

P. S. -A desert reports that there are several brigades in all, including Fitzhugh Lee's, and that Stuart commands in person; 6, 000 men and seven pieces of artillery.

OFFICE OF THE CHIEF QUARTERMASTER,

Camp near Frederick City, Md., June 28, 1863.

General M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General, Washington:

Your dispatch is received. I regret the misfortune, but do not understand that you hold me responsible for it. I gave orders for the teams just as i require other property. I had nothing to do with its escort. I only hope our losses may not be greater. Our trains here are not sufficiently guarded. We are deficient in cavalry now. All will be done that is possible.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Brigadier-General, Chief Quartermaster.