War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0305 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. -- UNION.

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feet at that time. From the length of the day, the necessary detention of the Peconic did not exceed eight hours, instead of twenty-four. On the outside blockade, notwithstanding that every precaution is taken to prevent the vessels from firing into each other at night, some narrow escapes have occurred. The necessary vigilance to prevent surprise in time of war must be observed, and I respectfully suggest to you to instruct the flag-of-truce boats that it will not be safe to approach nearer than 3 miles to the station of our picket-boat between sunset and weather. Flags of truce arriving at the picket station in time, incur no risk, and can always pass the fleet in safety. I suppose that by making proper provision on board the boats for the care of the sick and wounded, and by leaving City Point in due season, no inconvenience should hereafter be experienced, and I greatly regret that which may have arisen, from whatever cause, on this occasion.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, yours.

S. PHILLIPS LEE,

Acting Rear-Admiral.

BALTIMORE, MD.,

June 25, 1863-12. 30 a. m.

General HOOKER:

Your dispatch [24th] received. I will leave on the first train. Shall I let the column of 2, 100 under Lockwood proceed under their orders and report to Harper's Ferry or to some corps? Shall have time to get your answer before train leaves. Think we had better keep them, now they are ordered and ready to march this p. m.

DANL. BUTTERFIELD,

Major-General, Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ELEVENTH CORPS,

June 25, 1863-1 a. m.

General S. WILLIAMS,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Order to march received.

O. O. HOWARD,

Major-General.

JUNE 25, 1863.

Commanding Officer First Corps:

Assume command of the Third and Eleventh Corps, with your own. They are all under orders to cross the river to-day. A brigade of Stahel's cavalry, with four pieces of artillery, is order to report to you. I wish them to seize Crampton's Pass, and the one through which the National road passes, Turner's Gap, to-day, to be supported with a brigade of infantry and a battery as soon as they can

20 R R-VOL XXVII, PT III