War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0283 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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next, the 29th or 30th instant, and this command can then move. We have been working assiduously all day to comply with the order to [move to] the Monocacy, and I had issued the order for our men and teams to start this p. m., at 5 o'clock, intending to reach the Monocacy by noon to-morrow, if possible, and expecting to leave the work to be done more slowly by the workshop force here. From the tenor of your dispatch, I judge the general wishes me to remain and complete this work, and I shall revoke the order to start at 5 p. m. until I hear from you. Should you so order, I may still start in time to reach the Monocacy possibly to-morrow night, if this is important.

H. W. BENHAM,

Brigadier-General.

EDWARDS FERRY, June 24, 1863-12. 45 p. m.

General H. W. BENHAM, Navy-Yard:

If heavy supply trains are to continue crossing this bridge, we shall need at once a sufficient quantity of 2-inch plank to cover the roadway, 1, 580 feet in length, in order to save the chesses. The bridge over the canal also needs repairs badly, and I have no lumber to do it with.

CHAS. N. TURNBULL,

Captain of Engineers, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS STAHEL'S CAVALRY DIVISION, Fairfax Court-House, Va.,

June 24, 1863.

Major-General HEINTZELMAN, Commanding Department of Washington: GENERAL: I have just received the following order, which I shall comply with as soon as it is possible for me to get my supplies, although my command has not yet recovered from the fatigue of the last few days' march:

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC, Camp near Fairfax Court-House,

June 24, 1863.

Major-General STAHEL, Commanding Cavalry:

GENERAL: The major-general commanding directs that you move at once with your command to Harper's Ferry, and, on your arrival there, report to Major-General French. The following extract from General Orders, Numbers 30, headquarters Army of the Potomac, is sent you for your guidance: Division ordnance officers will be held responsible that the following supply of ammunition is kept constantly on hand. * * * For cavalry, 100 rounds of carbine and 40 rounds pistol, with that in the cartridge-boxes. For artillery, 250 rounds, with that in the ammunition chest. Very respectfully,

S. F. BARSTOW,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JUL. STAHEL,

Major-General.