War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0189 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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months' volunteers or militia for the immediate service of the United States, will they be accepted and credited to this State under the twelfth section of the conscription act, man for man, as if raised for three years or for the war; or will the term of service be taken into consideration when that act shall be put in force, thus requiring six-months' men to be counted only as one three-years' man? Second. If the nine-months' men from this State, whose term is now about expiring, should consent to serve for a further term of six months, would they receive any bounty or extra compensation from the United States?

JAS. Y. SMITH,

Governor.

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HEADQUARTERS UNITED STATES FORCES, Suffolk, Va.,

June 17, 1863.

Major General JOHN A. DIX,

Fort Monroe:

At 1 p. m. Colonel Spear had been unable to effect a crossing with the co-operation of General Foster. He found the fords barricaded and strongly picketed. Another attempt was to be made this afternoon, and, if unsuccessful, the expedition is ordered to return. Citizens in the vicinity state that two trains with troops came to the river last night.

MICHAEL CORCORAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTER UNITED STATES FORCES, Suffolk, Va.,

June 17, 1863.

Colonel D. T. VAN BUREN,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

Two regiments of General Wistar's brigade will leave this evening; two others, now out on reconnaissance, will leave as soon as they return, probably early to-morrow morning. They left Franklin this morning, coming in.

MICHAEL CORCORAN,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS FOURTH CORPS, Camp near Williamsburg, Va.,

June 17, 1863.

Major-General DIX,

Comdg. Department of Virginia, Fort Monroe:

SIR: There being no supplies up this Peninsula, if we advance farther we must establish depots, and guard them. This we could not do with my present force, and our means of transportation are very limited. If Lee has crossed to Pennsylvania with 90, 000 men, there is but one impediment to his going to Eastport, if he desires to go there; that is, the lack of ammunition, which possibly we may keep from him. How far he will elect to advance remains to be seen. Under such circumstances, it appears to me all our spare troops