War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0185 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

June 17, 1863-10. 45 p. m.

Colonel GEORGE W. MINDIL,

Twenty-seventh New Jersey Volunteers, Cincinnati:

You will accept for yourself, and express to your gallant regiment, the thanks of the Government for your patriotic offer, which is cordially accepted. You will please proceed with your regiment as rapidly as possible to Pittsburgh, by the way of the Ohio Central Railroad, in order that you may stop at Wheeling, if your services should be required there by General Brooks. He will communicate with you on the road, and you can reach Pittsburgh by that line if he should prefer to have you there.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

(Copy to Pittsburgh, care of General Brooks.)

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BALTIMORE, June 17, 1863.

Major-General COUCH:

No rebel force has crossed the Baltimore and Ohio road between this and Harper's Ferry. The enemy attacked at Harper's Ferry last night, and at 2. 30 this a. m. the telegraph office there was closed, and I suppose my troops at that place have withdrawn to Maryland Heights. The line is now working to Sandy Hook, a station near Harper's Ferry.

ROBT. C SCHENCK,

Major-General, Commanding.

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HARRISBURG, PA., June 17, 1863.

(Received 11. 35 a. m.)

Honorable SECRETARY OF WAR:

The militia, I think, will not generally be mustered for six months, but, with the advice of Mr. [William M.] Meredith, I suggest that they be mustered to serve during the emergency. Please answer.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

June 17, 1863-1 p. m.

Major-general COUCH,

Harrisburg:

What forces of the enemy has entered Pennsylvania, according to your best information, and where is it? Please answer immediately.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

June 17, 1863-1. 40 p. m.

Major-General COUCH,

Harrisburg, Pa.:

Let them be called upon to muster under the President's call. If they refuse, then muster them in whichever way you can.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.