War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0120 N. C., VA., W. VA., MD., PA., ETC. Chapter XXXIX.

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The answer to this dispatch must be sent me be telegraph on the

arrival of the boat at Alexandria, on or before 6 a. m. to-morrow,

if possible.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Brigadier General, Chief Quartermaster, Army of the Potomac.

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QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE, Washington,

June 15, 1863-4. 30 p. m.

Brigadier General R. INGALLS,

Chief Quartermaster, Hdqrs. Army of the Potomac:

Not less than 126 railroad cars were in use on the Aquia Creek and Falmouth Railroad. These cannot be all removed by to-night, unless they are taken across the river and dumped in shallow water. I hope the depot can be held by a guard and gunboats until the whole of this material is brought away, and that no burning such as last year's will occur. Should it be impossible to hold the place, the shells of the gunboats can do all necessary burning after the land force embarks. It would be better to dump the cars in shallow water, where they can be recovered, than either to burn them or leave them to the rebels. As the troops and the quartermasters at Aquia are under General Hooker's orders, the instructions which it may be proper to give should come from his headquarters. Last year I endeavored to prevent the burning of property in evacuation of Aquia, but though I understood that orders would be given to prevent it, there was much destruction, which the railroad men and the officers of the gunboats assured me afterward was unnecessary.

M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General.

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OFFICE OF THE CHIEF QUARTERMASTER, Fairfax Station, Va.,

June 15, 1863-6. 30 p. m.

General M. C. MIEGS,

Quartermaster-General, Washington:

Your dispatch is just received. All precautions were taken to secure the safe removal of all our public property at Aquia consistent with our military necessities. All the sick and wounded were removed last night. There was no danger of an attack. The rebels are too busy elsewhere; besides, a force under General Warren, was left to protect the removal of the depot, and Colonel Sawtelle had charge of our department there. I am satisfied the work can be done, though we were greatly hurried, and marched rapidly to secure desirable advantages, which I hope we now hold. I gave Colonel Sawtelle very definite orders what to do. I charged him not to burn the wharf or buildings. I assure you every possible protective measure was taken after it was decided to change our base. I am satisfied you know I would do all in my power. I hope you will believe all of us have done as do all in my power. I hope you will believe all of us have done as well as could be done. Our men and teams are in splendid condition.

RUFUS INGALLS,

Brigadier General, Chief Quartermaster, Army of the Potomac.