War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0111 Chapter XXXIX. CORRESPONDENCE, ETC. - UNION.

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WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington,

June 14, 1863-12 m.

Major-General DIX,

Fort Monroe, Va.:

Lee's army is in motion toward the Shenandoah Valley. All your available force should be concentrated to threaten Richmond, by seizing and destroying their railroad bridges over the South and North Anna Rivers, and do them all the damage possible. If you cannot accomplish this, you can at least find occupation for a large force of the enemy. There can be no serious danger of an attack on Norfolk now.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

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FORT MONROE, VA., June 14, 1863.

(Received 3. 45 p. m.)

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

Your dispatch in cipher is just received. I have a force above Diascund Bridge, moving toward Slatersville, 10 miles from the White House. I have a large force on the Blackwater, and I have arranged, if everything is favorable, to cross a cavalry force to-morrow over the Chowan, and destroy the railroad bridges south of the Nottoway River, on the Weldon Railroad. All the transports I have are ordered to Aquia Creek, and some of them have gone. If you will order them back as soon as they can be spared, I will concentrate all my force at West Point, and move toward Richmond. I have now no means of bringing the troops at Suffolk here, and my force up the Peninsula is too small to produce much disturbance.

JOHN A. DIX,

Major-General.

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WAR DEPARTMENT,

June 14, 1863-11. 10 a. m.

Major-General COUCH,

Harrisburg:

Your letter of the 12th is received. This Department is gratified at the cordial support and co-operation evinced by the State officials, and I trust that, commencing with such good auspices, your work will be attended with full success. You will communicate freely by mail or telegraph, officially or personally, as you deem proper.

EDWIN M. STANTON.

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WEST PHILADELPHIA, June 14, 1863.

(Received 12. 50 p. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

We find difficulty in getting our people aroused, but it is now being effected. The difficulty about no pay for troops until Congress meets is a serious one, but I think we can arrange to-morrow for the corporate and other moneyed interests of the State to Contribute, as a loan, sufficient to pay men until Congress meets. Shall leave nothing undone to effect speedy organization of forces.

THOMAS A. SCOTT.