War of the Rebellion: Serial 045 Page 0046 (Untitled)

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a little hesitation in withdrawing the infantry. Will you be able to keep him from crossing the river with the cavalry and batteries with you? If not, and you consider that the infantry will be of service in preventing a passage, please have it retained until further orders. I desire that you will send me your opinions on this subject. We shall be able to send up to you a thousand more cavalry tomorrow.

HOOKER,

Major-General.

[P. S.]-There has been great delay in the transmission of dispatches.

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HEADQUARTERS, FIFTH CORPS,

June 10, 1863-10. 30 a. m.

Brigadier General S. WILLIAMS

Headquarters Army of the Potomac:

No commissary supplies have as yet been delivered at Bealeton. Quartermaster's stores, I understand, are sent up every other day. The commissary at Alexandria was telegraphed yesterday, but no reply received. Is it intended to furnish subsistence stores at Bealeton, or must I send to Falmouth for the command at Kelly's Ford and vicinity?

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS, CAVALRY CORPS,

June 10, 1863.

Major-General STUART,

Commanding Cavalry Forces, C. S. Army:

GENERAL: I am anxious to obtain information as to the condition of a number of officer of my command who were left in your hands yesterday, to obtain the bodies of the dead, and the privilege of sending medical supplies and comfort to those who are wounded. I would also request permission to send over some ambulances, under the charge of a suitable number of surgeons, to bring off the severely wounded.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. PLEASONTON,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

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HEADQUARTERS, CAVALRY CORPS, Warrenton Junction,

June 10, 1863-2. 30 p. m.

Major General JOSEPH HOOKER,

Commanding Army of the Potomac:

Your dispatch of this date just received. Should the enemy's cavalry only cross the river, I am satisfied my cavalry can prevent any contemplated raid of cavalry. The enemy might throw over a force of infantry to assist in crushing me before the raid would be attempted. It would be well, therefore, to have a good force of infantry at Bealeton to check any