War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0941 Chapter XXXIX. EXPEDITION TO WYTHEVILLE, VA.

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JULY 13-25, 1863. -Expedition from Fayetteville, W. Va., to Wytheville, Va.

REPORTS.

Numbers 1. - Brigadier General E. Parker Scammon, U. S. Army, commanding Third Division, Eighth Army Corps, with congratulatory order.

Numbers 2. - Lieutenant Colonel Freeman E. Franklin, Thirty-fourth Ohio Infantry, commanding Third Brigade.

Numbers 3. - Major John J. Hoffman, Second West Virginia Cavalry.

Numbers 4. - Major General Samuel Jones, C. S. Army, commanding Department of Western Virginia.

Numbers 5. - Major T. M. Bowyer, C. S. Artillery, Chief of Ordnance, &c. Numbers 6. - Brigadier General John S. Williams, C. S. Army, commanding Second Brigade.

Numbers 7. - Colonel John McCausland, Thirty-sixth Virginia Infantry, commanding Fourth Brigade.

Numbers 8. - Captain H. Bowen, Eighth Virginia Cavalry.

Numbers 1. Report of Brigadier General E. Parker Scammon, U. S. Army, commanding Third Division, Eighth Army Corps, with congratulatory order.

CHARLESTON, July 24, 1863.

SIR: Colonel Toland, with the Second Virginia Cavalry and the Thirty-fourth Ohio Mounted Infantry, cut the railroad at Wytheville, Va. [July 18], and destroyed two pieces of artillery, 700 muskets, a large amount of ammunition and stores, and had a sharp fight in Wytheville. Captured 125 prisoners, who were paroled; killed, 75; wounded, not known. Our loss is 78 killed, wounded, and missing; 17 were killed, including Colonel Toland and Captain Delaney. Colonel Powell is very dangerously wounded, and is a prisoner. We were fired upon houses, public and private, by the citizens, even by the women. My men totally destroyed the town, and reached Fayetteville yesterday, after a march of about 300 miles.

E. P. SCAMMON,

Brigadier-General.

General KELLEY.

GENERAL ORDERS, Numbers 13.

HDQRS. THIRD DIV., EIGHTH ARMY CORPS, Charleston, W. Va., July 30, 1863.

The general commanding congratulates the troops of his command on the brilliant achievements of the Thirty-fourth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Mounted Infantry, the detachment of the First Virginia Cavalry, commanded by Captain Gilmore, consisting of one company under Captain Delaney, and one under Lieutenant Abraham, and such of the Second Virginia Volunteer Cavalry as took part in the recent combat at Wytheville.

The determination with which the brave Colonel Toland conducted the advance of a small force for more than 200 miles, through a mountainous country, in which almost every inhabitant was an enemy, and which was guarded by a military force more than six times greater than his own, does honor to our arms.