War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0925 Chapter XXXIX. DRAFT RIOTS IN NEW YORK CITY, ETC.

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(40 rounds for each man) for a company consisting of 65 citizens, as soon as the same have been organized and presented by Mr. Glassey. By command of Major-General Wool:

C. T. CHRISTENSEN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CHAMBERSBURG, Pa.,

July 16, 1863-9 a. m.

Major General H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief:

SIR: The movement of New York troops, via Frederick, was suspended last night by telegraph. Those men were dissatisfied at having to march into Maryland. It will be better to keep faith as to term of service, if possible. The emergency men of this State say that their time is up. Please inform me if the War Department will decide when those, as well as the militia, are to be discharged.

D. N. COUCH,

Major-General.

NEW YORK CITY, July 16, 1863.

(Received 10 a. m.)

Honorable E. M. STANTON:

SIR: In my judgment, a suspension of the draft would augment rather than allay public disorder. The friends of the Government can, and will, sustain a firm administration of the national authority.

E. DELAFIELD SMITH,

District Attorney.

NEW YORK, July 16, 1863.

(Received 1. 25 p. m.)

The SECRETARY OF WAR:

SIR: There is great disorder here. It is important to have the New York and Brooklyn regiments sent home at once.

HORATIO SEYMOUR.

NEW YORK, N. Y., July 16, 1863.

(Received 1. 25 p. m.)

General M. C. MEIGS:

SIR: The aspect of affairs unchanged. The mob is becoming better organized, hence more formidable, while our forces are not arriving fast enough. The mob will be put down, but the longer delayed the more difficult it will be. Five thousand good troops should arrive to-day. The Seventh Regiment arrived this morning. I should be telegraphed promptly as each regiment leaves, so as to have boats in readiness.

STEWART VAN VLIET,

Quartermaster.