War of the Rebellion: Serial 044 Page 0915 Chapter XXXIX. DRAFT RIOTS IN NEW YORK CITY, ETC.

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the draft is completed and the levies are in the field. I am not acquainted personally with General Butler, excepting from his capacity in New Orleans to rule a turbulent mob. He, or a man of capacity, would restore and keep order. The originators of the tumult are secessionists and vagabond politicians.

F. B. CUTTING.

WASHINGTON, D. C.

July 14, 1863-2. 30 p. m.

Honorable F. B. CUTTING,

New York:

SIR: Your telegrams received. This morning the New York Seventh was ordered home immediately, and others will be, if required.

EDWIN M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

Washington, July 14, 1863-2. 37 p. m.

Governor SEYMOUR,

New York:

SIR: The Secretary of War requests that you will call out sufficient militia force to quell the riot and enforce the laws in the city. Please confer with General Wool, who will co-operate with you. If absolutely necessary, troops will be sent from the field in Maryland, but this should be avoided as long as possible. Please telegraph if you deem them necessary to assist in maintaining order.

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

July 14, 1863-3. 05 p. m.

Rear-Admiral HIRAM PAULDING,

Commandant Navy-Yard, New York:

SIR: In the present state of affairs in New York, your first duty is to protect the navy-yard and public property. After that you can make such disposition of your force as circumstances may warrant.

GIDEON WELLES,

Secretary of the Navy.

WASHINGTON, D. C.,

July 14, 1863-3. 15 p. m.

Governor SEYMOUR,

Saint Nicholas Hotel, New York:

SIR: There is no railroad connection between this and Baltimore, or I should be with you. Please keep me informed. I have obtained 10, 000 muskets and accouterments, and all the clothing for artillery companies.

JOHN T. SPRAGUE,

Adjutant-General.